Spine Tingling Toilet View

According to the World Toilet Organization, approximately 2.4 billion people lacks access to a basic toilet.  I know this is a serious global matter, but in celebration of the World Toilet Day today, let me feature one unique toilet I found, used and amazed about when I visited Osaka this February 2015.

It is the public toilet found at Harukas 3000 Observatory, the top most floor of the highest building in Japan known as Harukas Abeno Tower in Tennoji, Osaka.

Japan I suppose has the most technologically advanced toilets.  But the one I found in Harukas 3000 Observatory is not about the toilet fixtures and facilities.  It is actually the breathtaking view inside the washroom.

don't be fooled by the minimalist look of the entrance...

don’t be fooled by the minimalist look of the entrance…

one rare view for a toilet!

one rare view for a toilet!

picture muna.  the reflection of the view on the mirror makes me dizzy...

picture muna. the reflection of the view on the mirror makes me dizzy…

you know the toilet is clean in you are willing to sleep in it.  up at the end are the cubicles...

you know a toilet is clean if you are willing to sleep in it. up at the end are the cubicles…

this is the spine-chilling view as soon as you open the door of the toilet cubicle after you relieved yourself

this is the spine-chilling view as soon as you open the door of the toilet cubicle after you relieved yourself

This toilet I guess is not for the faint at heart.  Acrophobic attacks would definitely starts to set in as soon as you enter it.  The walls of the toilet are thick clear glass in which toilet users would not have the choice but to look at the chilling panoramic view of the buildings, roads, bridges and other infrastructures of Kansai area.

Mapapa-tae ka sa lula!

Modern Bowel Movement

I hate winding up with thriving colonies of molds and mildews bonding together like concrete on my bathroom walls and floor.  That is why habitually, routinely and tirelessly I would scrub my bathroom and my toilet.

Early today while I scour, soap-up and wash my toilet which I consider to be a medieval form of torture, I remember taking photos of public restrooms during my recent trip to Japan.  It come not a surprise that this highly urbanized country has technologically advanced and sophisticated toilets.  They transformed the basic toilet facilities into ingenious comfort room devices.

To prove my point, here’s one photo of buttons to press of a modern Japanese public toilet inside a mall when I answered a call of nature and do a number two.

Notice those patterns of raised dots?  Those are Braille, making this toilet blind-friendly.

Notice those patterns of raised dots? Those are Braille, making this toilet blind-friendly.

I was nuts about the right most button (in the photo).  When I pressed it, an artificial sound of flushing waiter played on a speaker inside the toilet to disguise what otherwise obnoxious tune my butthole is producing.

Hay tek na pag pupu.